Leila Taleb

Year of call:

2018

Education:

2013 - Lancaster University / Universität Trier (1 year Erasmus) - LLB (Hons) European Legal Studies, 2:1

2015 - University of York - MA Applied Human Rights

2018 - University of Law Leeds - BPTC, Very Competent

Career:

2014-16 - Project & Advocacy Manager at JUST Yorkshire (racial justice organisation)

2016-17 - (S)GBV |& Communications consultant at ICLS (intercultural communication and leadership school)

2018-19 - Partnership & Grants Co-ordinator at Bahar Organisation, Turkey/Iraq

2019-20 - United Nations Development Programme (Iraq)

2020 - Pupil at Park Square Barristers

2021 - Tenant at Park Square Barristers

2021 - CPS Level 1 Prosecutor

2023 - CPS Level 2 Prosecutor

Appointments:

2016-present - Trustee/Management Committee member at Anah Project (local domestic violence refuge for BAMER women)

Memberships:

Inner Temple - 2017-present

Awards:

2017-18 - Advocacy Scholarship (Advocacy Scholar), University of Law 2017-18

2017 - New Economics Foundation (NEF) Media Spokesperson Scholarship

Languages:

German (Basic)

Leila is a tenacious criminal advocate whose charming and down-to-earth character sets her apart in terms of her advocacy as well as her ability to build lasting relationship with clients from all walks of life.

Leila specialises in criminal law and is a CPS Level 2 Panel advocate. She prosecutes and defends an array of offences including drugs, violence, dishonesty and sexual offences and has a flourishing jury practice. She has experience in the Crown, Magistrates’ and Youth Courts.

She has experience dealing with vulnerable witnesses and clients, including those with acute mental health problems. She is thus familiar with the fitness to plead procedure and mental health disposals available to any sentencing Court.

Before practising at the Bar, Leila worked within the international development sector in Iraq, Turkey and Syria working for United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and other Non-Governmental Organisations. Her understanding of cultural sensitivities is aided by her experience of working within diverse communities and within multinational contexts.

Leila’s background of campaigning on issues of social justice is what informed her career path. She continues to try to make a difference in her community by volunteering. She, therefore, takes pride in representing vulnerable individuals and leaving no stone unturned.

Notable Cases:

R v P.M (2023): Leila successfully defended the Defendant at trial facing two counts of strangulation. The Defendant had a previous conviction for murder, therefore a conviction at trial would have had undoubtable serious consequences for any likelihood of a future release. Following a three-day trial, Not Guilty verdicts on all counts were returned by the jury at York Crown Court.

R v G, W et al ; R v F, R and S; R v C & H (2023): Leila acted as disclosure junior on a large drugs OCG across four criminal trials. It led to multiple Guilty verdicts and/or pleas from 7 out of 9 Defendants (the jury was hung in respect of one Defendant).

Highly Reported Cases:

R v Lee Kennett Moore: prosecuting a man who was described as an ‘incredibly inept’ burglar caught dangling upside down by his shoelaces. Reported across all local media and national media including Private Eye and BBC News

 

Leila has recently been appointed as one of 11 Inclusion and Diversity panel members for Rugby Football Union (RFU) to hear all disciplinary cases relating to rugby matters involving allegations of discriminatory behaviour.

Leila is regularly instructed by the Government Legal Department (GLD) in civil human rights claims against prisoners who have brought claims of Personal Injury against the Ministry of Justice. She has undertaken the drafting of witness statements and the redaction of documents for use in inquests on behalf of GLD.

She is currently instructed as a disclosure junior on a very high-profile civil case concerning allegations of malicious prosecution and failures of disclosure in substantive criminal proceedings.

Leila has represented the police in applications for Sexual Harm Prevention Orders, Sexual Risk Orders, Forced Marriage Protection Orders and Anti-Social Behaviour Order Injunctions in the Magistrates’ and Youth courts. She is regularly instructed in Proceeds of Crime applications on behalf of the Police and on behalf of Respondents who face forfeiture. She has also been instructed in applications for Drug Dealing Telecommunications Restriction Orders made on behalf of policing authorities.

She has been instructed in proceedings involving the revocation of taxi licences, whether be on behalf of the local authority or on behalf of those who are responding to such applications.

Leila has experience appeals to the Mental Health Tribunal, parole board adjudications and private prosecutions.

Notable Cases:

SYP v A.B (2024): defended forfeiture proceedings in respect of confiscated cash against the police

Reported Cases:

Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police v Sugar Club (2023): representing the police in successful application to revoke premises licence of local club in Barnsley

Leila is able to grasp the complexity of an employment law case whilst still ensuring the ‘bigger picture’ is not lost before a tribunal.

Leila has appeared in cases involving a multitude of claims involving unfair dismissal, discrimination, unlawful deduction of wages and breach of contract on behalf of Claimants and Respondents.

She uses her expertise in criminal law including jury advocacy to bring a flair to the presentation of her employment cases.

She also regularly drafts advices on appeal, remedy and merits of claims.

Notable Cases:

TM v BC (2022): Partial success as acting for the Respondent. Claimant’s claim of direct racial discrimination in respect of events that took place over a period of two days was not well-founded and was dismissed (the Claimant’s claim for direct racial discrimination in respect of one particular day was well-founded).

K v MoJ (2024): successfully brought a claim for disability discrimination and unfair dismissal against the MoJ. Both claims were found to be well-founded. Acting for the Claimant.

 

 

Contact Leila’s clerks